Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Tuesday 16 May 2017

Review: Urinetown The Musical at Brighton Little Theatre

Twenty years of drought have made the use of private toilets verboten in this dystopian satire - poor people have to pay to pee in corporation-controlled urinals - and woe betide anyone who disobeys.
Photo by Miles Davies

Narrator Officer Lockstock (Tony Bright) and street urchin Little Sally (Elsie Lovelock) are our guides through this unappealing future. We meet a succession of low-life characters at Public Amenity No 9, including its manager, Penelope Pennywise played with brio and a sensational voice by Katy Markey (also responsible for the fluid - and where necessary hilarious - choreography). 

The story unfolds, and we soon meet the politically-entangled baddies of the piece - but to give too much away would be to spoil it. Needless to say, with a self-proclaimed "dreadful title" like Urinetown, the story doesn't have a particularly happy ending.

Musical conventions are gently (or not so gently) skewered and parodied throughout the show, but the songs (and especially the lyrics) are on-point even at their most parodic; the cast deliver and then some - the ensemble singing in the bijou space of the Brighton Little Theatre is gorgeous.

It's unfair to single cast members out but highlights for me were the aforementioned Elsie Lovelock, Tony Bright and Katy Markey; the upright and unhinged Caldwell (played by Neil Sellman) nursing a bunny-metaphor obsession (don't ask) and planning his escape to Rio; everyman character Bobby (Ollie Wray) and the charming Hope (Ellie Earl) as the hero and heroine of the piece. 

Emily Hardy and Ernest Stroud play twisted nutcases from a parallel West Side Story and Hari Johnson's hilariously over the top turn as Caldwell"s prancing toady also get a special mention for being hilarious.

The set, sound and lighting are, as always at Brighton Little, superb (as are the band, led by Musical Director Gary Nock). Costumes, make up and wigs are spot on. Director Louis Craig (who also helmed the wonderful production of "A Little Night Music" at Brighton Little) should be rightly proud of this inspired production - the hard work is right there on the stage.

Hopefully after this review you"ll be bursting to go - so get yourself a ticket and find some relief at Brighton Little Theatre, until 20th May 2017. CLICK HERE for more info.

by: Gary Cook




Share    


Roy Hudd takes us on an oral journey from his beginnings in music hall to his upcoming starring role in Oscar Wilde's A Woman of No Importance, at Theatre Royal Brighton.

South African choreographer Dada Masilo's Giselle - which plays at Brighton Dome, this October - brings the ballet into the 21st century. The Soweto-born choreographer and dancer has taken the classic favourite and thoroughly shaken it up so audiences can anticipate the unexpected.

With a childhood spent foraging and learning to make flapjacks and nettle soup, followed by a life of touring as a musician around the world and delighting in the delicious local delicacies discovered along the way, a love for food and cooking has always been central to Cerys Matthews' life. 

It was two years ago that the then Brighton Festival Guest Director Kate Tempest played a secret gig in the city and performed an exclusive rendition of her unreleased new album, The Book Of Traps & Lessons.
Credit Chris Nash

With this autumn tour called Final Edition the The Richard Alston Dance Company will embark on its farewell tour, giving one final opportunity for a Brighton audience to see a live performance by what is undoubtedly one of the world's best dance ensembles.

A campaign & fund raiser is up-and-running to place a permanent rainbow crossing on St James Street, Kemp Town, Brighton.

Genre-blending artist, multi-instrumentalist and producer Gazel has skillfully concocted an original theme that runs through her forthcoming debut album, Book Of Souls.
Credit Onneke Northcote-Green

Art lovers from far and wide will descend on East Sussex in the coming weeks as Artwave, the annual free arts festival, welcomes thousands of people into private homes, studios, galleries and workshops.

Mystery Jets' new single, Screwdriver - taken from their forthcoming sixth studio album, A Billion Heartbeats -  is an uncompromising look at the rise of the rebranded alt-right in the UK, built around a powerfully positive message: "Fight them with love / then the world will be ours".

Femme Fatale, the imagined meeting between activist Valerie Solanas and singer Nico, asks what might have happened if two female visionaries with very different methods had locked horns. 
Credit Miles Davies Photography

Director Claire Lewis brings this lovely adaptation of George Eliot's classic doorstop novel, The Mill on the Floss, to life at the Brighton Little Theatre with gusto. 
Credit Darren Bell

Jason Donovan is about to take his first steps in the role of producer, when the new production of Priscilla Queen of the Desert visits Theatre Royal Brighton, later this year.
Credit Andrew Whitton 2019

"Our last gig of the world tour was September 2018, in Brooklyn - I was done, had written no songs, nothing new, I thought I felt like quitting for a while," says Stereophonics frontman, Kelly Jones.

One Eyed Jacks was Spear of Destiny's second release on the major label Epic Records. For many original fans this is the band's seminal album.

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd