Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Monday 12 February 2018

Keep Fabrica: Brighton Arts Charity Launches Appeal Following Funding Cuts To The Visual Arts Organisation

Brighton's contemporary art gallery Fabrica has launched a crowdfunding appeal to rescue its finances in light of recent funding cuts which threaten the organisation"s future. 

Fabrica's appeal offers donors a range of rewards in return for their support, including original artwork by artists it has presented, and the opportunity to host a private screening in its 200-year-old Regency building in the Lanes.
 
Until last year Fabrica received a £20,000 regular grant from Brighton & Hove City Council but following local funding cuts, the charity was told in January 2017 that a bid to renew the grant under the Council's new commissioning model had been unsuccessful. 

Despite cost reduction measures implemented over the last year, Fabrica is facing a gap in its finances that it is trying to fill by the end of March 2018.

Fabrica has been at the heart of the community in the city for 22 years, having been initiated in 1996 by four artists, including Liz Whitehead the present Director, from local studio group, Red Herring. 

Alongside the three major contemporary installations it presents each year (past exhibitions have included Anish Kapoor, Martin Parr, Brian Eno and Janet Cardiff), Fabrica delivers a range of community outreach activities that reach some of the city"s most vulnerable people.

Liz Whitehead, Director, explains: "In previous years, a £20,000 gap would not have been such a big deal. But like many other arts organisations we've really felt the impact of austerity on our fundraising over the past year - it's become so much more competitive and fewer of our bids have been successful. 

"We've cut our staffing bill but due to associated redundancy costs the full impact of this won"t be felt until April 2018. 

"Although we're raising much more profit from commercial activities like venue hire than ever before, we haven"t been able to raise enough income to make up for the loss of our Council grant. 

"Our reserves simply can't take a £20,000 hit this financial year so if our appeal is unsuccessful, we will be forced to cut our programmes and we might lose some of the activities that people can  access for free or at low cost. 

"This really saddens me because Fabrica is all about reducing barriers to contemporary art - and if you're on a low income, cost is a major barrier."

The arts charity set up Brighton"s Men's Shed in 2017 as part of the city's suicide prevention framework and regularly hosts Chomp, a free lunch and arts club for low-income families. 

It provides opportunities for 200 volunteers every year, over 20% of whom have a disability.
 
As Liz Whitehead says: "Because of our depleted reserves, our Board may decide that it is too risky to keep the organisation afloat if we end the year with a deficit. This would be a massive loss and we"re determined not to let this happen."

GET INVOLVED:
 
The charity will be hosting a sponsored Draw-A-Thon & Writers' Relay fundraiser in the gallery on 24 February, hosted by artist Jane Fordham and author Jackie Wills. The event will see up to 30 local writers take turns to write live - while audiences watch as their writing is projected on a big screen - and teams of local artists drawing continuously for five hours. They will be accompanied by local musicians throughout the day. Members of the public can drop in any time between 11am and 4pm to watch, draw along, and buy tea and cake.
 
"The sponsored event will be a great way to mobilise Brighton's artistic community in raising funds for Fabrica, which has supported local artists for many years.".


by: Mike Cobley




Share    


Sometimes it's good to be challenged, to be mystified by unfolding events, to be totally flummoxed by the juxtaposition of what's being revealed. But other times it's best to admit defeat and realise there is no mystery, just bitter disappointment.
Photo by Michael Fung Photography

Brighton Festival 2017's Guest Director Kate Tempest made a surprise return to the city on for a secret gig as part of the Festival's Your Place initiative, performing an exclusive rendition of her unreleased new album in full at Hangleton Community Centre. 

Snow Patrol are set to return with Wildness, their first album in seven years, which finds the band searching for clarity, connection, and meaning, while staying true to the melodic songwriting prowess that brought them to prominence. 

From an angel and a tennis player to a joyfully paint-splashed lady, Hangleton and East Brighton residents have been creating life-size 'avatars': colourfully painted, cut-out figures that explore who they are or who they would like to be for a Brighton Festival project called Looking Through Each Other's Eyes.

Rituals is the ambitious new album from Australian musician Amaya Laucirica (who played a storming set at last weekend's Brighton's Great Escape Festival). Her work blends the swirling contours of the Cocteau Twins with the wistful melodies of The Go-Betweens and the sonic depth of Yo La Tengo. 

Following last year's success, Byline Festival returns to Pippingford Park, in East Sussex, and once again promises festivalgoers a unique opportunity to recapture the spirit of festivals when they had a sense of purpose. 

John Finnemore has followed a well worn path and is pretty much your definitive BBC Radio 4 comedian; studied English at Cambridge University and cut his teeth in the Cambridge footlights rising to become its vice president in his final year. After graduating, he performed in Sensible Haircut with the Footlights team at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2000.

Following band frontman Mike Peters' major undertaking for last week's Record Store Day – which saw him perform at record shops in London, New York and Los Angeles in a three-stop transcontinental trip within twenty-four hours – The Alarm announce the release of their new album Equals.

A special ceremony is being held next month at Woodvale Cemetery, Brighton, to return the gravestone of Thomas Highflyer, a 12-year-old slave boy who was rescued from a slave dhow and died in Brighton 148 years ago.

My first visit to The Spire. As you may have guessed from the name it was once a church (St Mark's Chapel, in East Brighton). This one has been converted to an arts venue. It still looks very much like a church though, just missing the pews and altar etc and of course, it has a stage… and wonderfully, and at least on this night, a foyer with seating and a bar.

It was always a pleasure for The Brighton Magazine to host The Beat's Dave Wakeling, when he performed in the city as part of the 3 Men & Black collective (alongside Jake Burns from Stiff Little Fingers and Pauline Black and Nick Welsh from The Selecter).

A new play by Townsend Theatre Productions relives the extraordinary true story of the Grunwick Strike, a dispute that challenged the way women and immigrants are treated in the workplace.

Brighton based gallery 35 North Contemporary Fine Art is set to host Deanland, a new exhibition of original work by painter Alexander Johnson and photographer John Brockliss. 
Pic by Paul Mansfield

The Rock House Festival 2018 brings together learning disabled bands and upcoming and established music-makers from Brighton and beyond for a day of live music at Green Door Store, Brighton.

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd