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Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Sunday 17 October 2010

Brighton Retailer Launches Hard-Hitting Campaign Against Greyhound Racing

For many a night at the dogs or a flutter at the bookies is just a bit of harmless fun, but for the dogs used by the greyhound racing industry there is much more at stake.
Cosmetics Firm Urge 'Don't Bet On It'

It is estimated that thousands of retired greyhounds go 'missing' from the industry every year and most of them are presumed dead, no longer useful or profitable to their owners.

The greyhound industry is said by some to have a lot to be ashamed of. Thousands of greyhound puppies are killed every year because they are too slow or shy for the tracks.

Dogs that do become racers face an uncertain retirement when they become too slow at the age of four or five.

An Associate Parliamentary Working Group report estimated that at least 4,728 dogs disappear from the tracks every year and that the majority of them are slaughtered.

Although the Greyhound industry gives £1.7 million toward the rehoming of ex-racing dogs, this does not excuse, explain or cover even half of what it would cost to rehome the missing dogs.



Tony Peters, co-founder of Greyhound Action, a group campaigning against greyhound racing commented:

"The greyhound racing industry is in decline, and we are convinced that when people learn about the death and neglect facing racing dogs even more stadiums will close due to poor attendance."

Greyhound dogs are dying to entertain punters, literally. Because dogs are running at high speeds around tight bends, injuries and collisions are commonplace.

Thirty dogs were euthanised at Belle Vue track in Manchester in 2009 alone, due to injuries they picked up from the track. Sadly, when many greyhounds are no longer profit making they are killed.



At Lush Cosmetics, 41 East Street, Brighton, they like backing the underdogs, which is why, all 85 of their British shop fronts will be emblazoned with the words 'Don't Bet On It' underneath a giant image of racing greyhounds

Lush feel that most of the problems associated with the industry come down to the nearly £2.5 billion in bets being placed annually, and with that sort of money at stake the lives and well-being of the dogs inevitably suffer.

Lush Campaigns Manager Sean Gifford said:

"The greyhound industry treats dogs as profit making machines, but we see them as sensitive, intelligent animals that deserve better.

"There are a lot of people who love and care for greyhounds, and we are sure they will support our calls for the end to an industry which has failed to look after its animals."


The awareness campaign will feature in-store leaflets, a special web-site, and recently ex-racing greyhounds visited the shop to show the public how warm, affectionate and adoptable these lovely animals can be.

Lush customers were also invited to join in their 'Human Race', where the participants will competed against each other in silly foot races to win prizes.

Each racer wore a large racing number, 4,728, with the word 'missing' printed on it to highlight how greyhound dogs are the real losers at the tracks.

by: Mike Cobley




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Credit Tom Woollard

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