Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Saturday 04 July 2020

Interview: Paul Weller Talks Lockdown, Dislike Of Music Streaming & New Album On Sunset

On Sunset, Paul Weller's fifteenth solo album, which drops this Friday, sees one of the UK's most successful songwriters barely affected by the present situation that has placed the music industry, as much as the wider economy, largely on pause: "I haven't really been bothered by the lockdown, other than having to queue for food or medicine." 
Credit Nicole Nodland

As Weller explains, in spite of all else happening out there in the world that has created many uncertainties, he feels fortunate and contented.  

Having turned sixty-two over the most recent bank holiday, it seems he is very much at ease with himself these days, some distance from the widely perceived image of the 'angry young man' of his early career fronting The Jam.

"I don't really celebrate birthdays, but my daughter shares mine, so it's very much about her," he gestures breezily, explaining that if anything, he's enjoying songwriting more than ever, and is in a rich vein of creativity.

The 'Modfather' belongs in that most rare of categories in being an artist who has successfully reinvented himself over the course of more than forty years. 

He's managed to walk the line between classic rock, punk and new wave, through to 60s soul that inspired the Style Council, and later balladry that has equally attracted critical acclaim and resonated with long-term fans.


His last recording two years ago, True Meanings, narrowly missed becoming Weller's fifth number one solo album, but having consciously built it around the lilting lullaby of Gravity, he says that it placed him in a strong position considering his latest recordings.

While the unwelcome arrival of the coronavirus pandemic may have scratched out his remaining round of UK gigs, he has instead been squirrelling himself away in his beloved Surrey studio, Black Barn, to lay down new material.

"I've actually been very focused being at home these past few weeks, doing a lot of writing, as well as some more recording in the studio. 

"To be honest, these days when I am not working, I am actually home quite a lot with my wife and kids as we've been home schooling. 


"I haven't really been bothered by the lockdown, other than having to queue for food or medicine," he offers of the present situation that has placed the music industry, as much as the wider economy, largely on pause.

Beyond music, family is clearly a major priority, and he seems pleased at least two of his eight children including daughter Leah have shown real musical ability. 

He quips that "they sometimes patronise me," in a fashion only children can achieve with their parents. 

For his own part, he's more than ready to release his latest album, On Sunset, which notably stands as his 15th solo recording.  


Lead single Earth Beat offered a lush slice of soul pop, which was swiftly followed by Village, which neatly sums up its optimistic spirit that seems refreshingly relaxed amid these complex, challenging times.

It's a consistent theme across a record that places centre stage some of the soul motifs belying his earliest musical influences. 

There are also touches of electronica and orchestral arrangements that reveal he's keen to experiment musically when the mood takes him.

"I wouldn't say making music has got any harder. I think I'm actually enjoying the process and the writing a lot more now than I ever did before in terms of recording. 


"I have a great respect and appreciation for it and seeing how the finished songs are," says Weller, who co-produced the new album with long-term collaborator Jan 'Stan' Kybert, whose long list of credits include working with the likes of Oasis, The Verve and Massive Attack.

"I wanted to do an album that was soulful and also had an electronic edge to it. Most of the songs on it are quite uplifting, and to me it's a sunshine record. 

"With Village, like a lot of my songs, there's a lot of me in there, so there's a key idea, but then you make it broader to be about other people, you extemporise. 

"So am I contented? yes I am – I'm fortunate and couldn't wish for anything," he acknowledges.

His previous recordings have been noted for a careful sprinkling of notable guests down the years, and his latest follows in this pattern. 

There are appearances from his old friend Mick Talbot from Style Council days, Slade's Jim Lea playing violin on the very 60s-influenced Equanimity, and several backing vocal tracks from indie outfit The Staves.

As for the album's title track, he says On Sunset was inspired by catching up with his eldest son in Los Angeles, which holds particularly strong memories for him as a teenager on his first tour of America.

"I was out near the Whisky A Go Go Club in LA and hadn't really walked that area of the city since I was nineteen. A huge amount of time has elapsed since then, so it's a reflective song about that. 

"It also became something else about being in a place in time looking for old friends and lovers and how everyone has moved on," he says of the album's core theme that offers a nostalgic glance over his shoulder. 

Connecting with pieces of the past clearly informed his choice of record label, Polydor, for which he had gained an initial flush of success alongside Bruce Foxton and Rick Buckler as fresh faces recording with The Jam. 

"We approached Polydor as we really liked what they have been doing lately and they have some great acts. It's a very different world there now though. 

"It was a little weird this time as everyone was at least twenty years younger than me, whereas when I was there before, it was the other way around and it felt that there were a lot of old men running around telling me what to do!"

Discussing yesteryear brings us on to the subject of another key anniversary in 2020. 

It's now been 25 years since Weller released Stanley Road, perhaps his most autobiographical recording to date, in being named after the street he grew up in Woking, Surrey.

The seminal album contains some of his most cherished solo material including tracks such as The Changingman, Broken Stones and You Do Something To Me.

"I can't believe it's 25 years old, but I still think it's a great record that stands up now. 

"It showed the progress made since that first solo album. It was just a really creative time for me and I've some really fond memories of that period."

As well as his strong attention to sartorial detail as befitting anyone from the mod revival scene, Weller has been noted for his passion for seeking out new music and offering assistance to likeminded acts.

He's still passionate about touring, and says his regular touring band, including Ocean Colour Scene's Steve Cradock, are 'chomping at the bit" to get back out on the road'. 

As he notes, the present musical landscape is a very different one from his youth, but what has changed the most?

"Where do I start. Well, streaming for one, that has changed everything. Someone told me the other day that a band had a number one with 7,000 sales. But streaming is where it's at, it's not something that you can ignore. 

"I could have a mini moan about things like that, but I don't want to sound like a grumpy old git. 

"I think the main reason I haven't liked it is that people are not getting paid out of it, particularly up-and-coming bands, meaning it's getting hard for them to make a living now.

"I've never believed that music should just be free as some people do. 

"So it's good to see that vinyl is still out there even if it's not in great numbers, and I'm going to be releasing my album on cassette as well," he adds, then signals it's time to get back to business in the recording studio, highlighting that he's lost none of the drive to keep pushing himself after more than four memorable decades in the industry.

Paul Weller's new album 'On Sunset', is released on Friday 3rd July 2020. To pre-order a copy CLICK HERE.  Catch 'the Modfather' at The Brighton Centre on Saturday 26th June 2021. For tickets CLICK HERE. 

by: Mike Cobley & Neill Barston




Share    

Writer & Director Helena Coan

Theatre Royal Brighton features in a new feature-length documentary on the life of Hollywood and cultural icon, Audrey Hepburn.

“It was love at first sight” for a Dogs Trust pup, who was rescued by the dog welfare charity from a puppy farm and has recently found herself at the centre of a national television ad campaign.

Brighton-based troubadour Passenger's (Mike Rosenberg) new video for the single Suzanne picks up where 'A Song for the Drunk and Broken Hearted' left off – in a half empty dive bar where the camera's focus moves away from the sad clown band and switches to one particular drunk and broken-hearted patron named Suzanne who is reflecting on days gone by. 

Five formerly homeless people joined a Zoom call with royalty, when a visit to Brighton had to be postponed due to COVID-19 restrictions.

During second lockdown, Towner Eastbourne are designing and distributing a new series of activity packs that will make life a little better for the most vulnerable families in Eastbourne and Seaford. 

Looking for unique Christmas gifts for friends and family that will help support the arts?

Throughout December, Midsummer Nightcap is launching a Christmas Pundemic - a socially distanced Christmas festival with music and Cabaret in the heart of Brighton.

Some of the city's most vulnerable rough sleepers will be able to benefit from targeted, appropriate support and accommodation after Green Councillors secured backing to expand the 'Housing First' scheme in Brighton and Hove. 

In celebration of his new autobiography I Wanna Be Yours, the original 'people's poet' Dr. John Cooper Clarke will be performing at Brighton Dome, next summer.
Credit Rick Guest

Dancers from Brighton are among those invited to take part in a survey to identify what concerns they are facing right now, and how better to mobilise resources and to help support them. 

Film school staff and a student have created a moving short film to help raise money for The Crown actress Olivia Coleman's charity, Tender.

Opening with Donald Trump's notorious “grab them by the pussy” quote, Anna Straker's latest release attacks gender stereotypes and the attitude that “boys will be boys.” 

A new play, premiering this week, evokes the spirits of Jean-Michel Basquiat and Frida Kahlo through live stream, bringing theatre back to a locked-down UK. 

Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd