Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Thursday 26 October 2017

Can You See Me Now: Young Miss Represented Women Given A Voice In New Brighton-Bound Show

Brighton Dome and Brighton Festival's flagship project Miss Represented is going on tour for the first time, taking new show Can You See Me Now? to Brighton and beyond, including two nights at The Basement.

Miss Represented works with young women who face challenging life situations, using the arts to explore life experiences gaining a deeper understanding of themselves and the world around them.

This year the group of 12 young women aged 13-21 have been working to create Can You See Me Now? a body of work which follows the experiences of those often unheard, finding their way through life, inviting audiences to see the world through their eyes. 

A cross-art performance combining theatre, film, spoken word and music, the piece explores the experiences of the young women as they go through school, the care system or contact with Social Services. 

It examines our inner and outer worlds, cycles of holding it together, saying you"re fine, until everything crumbles, and how we build ourselves back up again. 


Rebecca Fidler, Creative Project Manager says: 

"Sharing stories and experiences creatively is a powerful tool for personal development and social change, so to visit arts venues, schools and Pupil Referral Units in Brighton and beyond is a fantastic opportunity. 

"We want to connect with diverse audiences sparking dialogue and debate with our new show and Q&A, enabling the girls to use their creative skills, see themselves in different ways and connect with a whole range of people across society. 

"There is such value in engaging in these creative processes and making a commitment to something as ambitious as a tour, we are excited to take that leap and see where the adventure takes us."

Since Miss Represented started in 2011, the project's achievements have included a collaboration with multi award-winning rapper Plan B, an appearance on BBC Radio 1Xtra, a retrospective of work at Brighton Dome to celebrate International Women"s Day and sell-out performances of their show Home: Life which explored experiences of being young and homeless with little or no support system. 

Young women from Miss Represented also recently shared their stories as pop-up performances around Brighton this May as part of Brighton Festival 2017 commission the Storytelling Army.

Can You See Me Now? will be touring to schools and pupil referral units, as well as public performances at The Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts (9 Nov), The Basement (24 & 25 Nov), The Black-E (17 Nov), Bridge 5 Mill (18 Nov) and Battersea Arts Centre (2 Dec). The show is pay what you choose, but advance booking is required. An audience Q&A will follow each performance.

by: Mike Cobley




Share    

Whats on in Brighton today


While touring the UK in November 2016, American songwriter Amelia White viewed the bitterly divisive election season back home via the BBC, and from a promoter's attic began to complete the songs on her album, Rhythm Of The Rain. 

Stone Foundation's new album, Everybody, Anyone, was recorded at Paul Weller's Black Barn Studios in Surrey and features a sprinkling of guest musicians.

For too long festivals have been too male and now Byline Festival is doing something beyond the usual rhetoric….

The flamboyant world of Brighton in the 1880s and back-street life of the 1930s and 50s are the focus of two new books from community publisher QueenSpark Books.

Reading the wonderful new Ronnie Lane oral biography, Can You Show Me A Dream?, it would be easy for the reader to be left with the impression that Ronnie's life cycle had been a wild journey with a sad ending. But for Ronnie the journey hadn't ended. The letter had left the envelope, that's all.

Black Deer Festival takes place in the beautiful surroundings of Eridge Park, Britain's oldest deer park, located on the Kent/East Sussex border near Tunbridge Wells, and you can expect an array of authentic americana-style meats, smokey whiskeys, bespoke custom bike showcases, storytellings from cultural pioneers, not to mention a line-up of artists across the Americana, blues, roots, authentic country, folk and bluegrass genres.  

The RPMs new single Let Things Happen raises the bar significantly for this young Brighton band. 
(c) Tom Sheehan 2018

Del Amitri return this summer for a UK tour, the celebrated Glaswegian band's first run of dates since 2014.

Albert Hammond Jr's latest album Francis Trouble explores a deeply personal topic – the stillborn death of his twin brother, Francis, and the lingering effects that event has had in his life and music. 

Sea Life Brighton has issued an urgent appeal for the public to become more responsible with their waste after collecting a record amount of rubbish on Brighton beach. 

One-hundred years on from the first women in the country being granted the right to vote, Brighton Dome has been officially recognised as one of forty-one buildings across England that were at the centre of suffragette action.

Joan Armatrading is a woman of candour – not to mention can do. She gets straight to the heart of the matter, and she delivers.

The drama and magic of Glyndebourne Festival provide the inspiration for a new children’s book, The Mulberry Bees.

Fusing powerful song writing with musical flare, Brighton-based Hatful of Rain combine their English, Celtic and American inspirations to great effect on their new album. 

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd