Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Saturday 02 February 2019

Brighton Artist Illustrates New Edition Of Ray Bradbury's Something Wicked This Way Comes

A darkly poetic tale of smoke and mirrors, temptation and lost innocence, Something Wicked This Way Comes continues to influence the modern masters of horror. 

Echoes of the sinister carousel move through the heart of Neil Gaiman"s award-winning American Gods, while Stephen King, who wrote extensively about the book in his non-fiction work Danse Macabre, advises that it is: 

'One of those books about childhood … that adults should take down once in a while … not just to give to their own children, but in order to touch base again themselves with childhood's brighter perspectives and darker dreams."

Like Bradbury's prose, the images in this special The Folio Society edition invite the reader to venture a little deeper into that dark tent, promising wonders and horrors and everything in between. 

Tim McDonagh is an illustrator (who has worked on 'Something Wicked This Way Comes') living and working in Brighton, England. 

He uses a mix of traditional media including brushes, ink and pens mixed with a digital finish to create his artworks. 


Comedian and actor Frank Skinner lists the book as amongst his favourites, and in his incisive and affectionate introduction to this edition he examines the many delicious flavours of fear in a novel layered with meaning and portents:

"I want to tell you why I love this book but in a way that doesn't diminish your personal encounter with it. 

"I want, rather, to enhance the experience you are about to have. More foreplay than foreword. Let me be your ramp.

"The main reason I love this book is Bradbury's prose. It is so rich, so ornate, so perfect for this macabre tale. 

"The style reminds me, somehow, of Jack Kerouac's."

Ray Bradbury was a full-time writer from the age of twenty-three who was born in Illinois in 1920, and spent most of his life in Los Angeles. 

He released his seminal work of dystopian science fiction, Fahrenheit 451, in 1953. He died in 2012.

'Something Wicked This Way Comes' By Ray Bradbury. Introduced by Frank Skinner. Illustrated by Tim McDonagh. CLICK HERE to purchase.

by: Mike Cobley




Share    

Credit Adam Harvey @ I Shoot Bands

It's all things new for the return of James Bond. New director, plot, cast, villain, title and, of course, music. 
Credit Gus Coral

Photographs of The Rolling Stones had been gathering dust beneath photographer Gus Coral's bed for sixty years. 

First the sad news. Into The Punset - which visits East Sussex, later this year - is the farewell tour of UK-based Canadian gag master Stewart Francis. The great news is that he's promising to go out with a show that proves he's at the peak of his punchline-making powers

There Will Be No Intermission is Sussex-bound Amanda Palmer's first solo album in more than six years, as well as being her most powerful and personal collection to date, with songs that tackle the big questions: life, death, grief and how we make sense with it all.

The clock is counting down to the deadline for the South Downs National Park's annual Photo Competition and the chance to win up to £250.

To mark twenty years of The Sopranos, three of the biggest characters from the seminal hit show will visit the Brighton Centre, for an up close and personal 'In Conversation' style show.

Mystery Jets' new single, Screwdriver - taken from their forthcoming sixth studio album, A Billion Heartbeats -  is an uncompromising look at the rise of the rebranded alt-right in the UK, built around a powerfully positive message: "Fight them with love / then the world will be ours".

“I've learned a lot from making big mistakes,” says Sophie & The Giants' singer Sophie Scott. “When you're younger you think you know how the world works .. but you fucking don't." 

Ralph Pelleymounter's new album, Dead Debutante's Ball, was recorded over ten long days during Britain's hottest summer in decades, and so named “because it's a good title for someone releasing a solo album so late in their career.”
Photographer unknown

As part of Heritage Open Day on later this month, newly acquired photographs of David Bowie performing at Brighton Dome will go on display in the venue for the first time.

“This is an album for anyone who's ever turned to music in a time of crisis, whether personal or political. It's about the solace one can get from listening to music or playing music when everything else has gone wrong. It's about finding kernels of hope and renewal in dire situations.”

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd