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Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Tuesday 09 October 2018

Something For Your M.I.N.D: Superorganism Shed Their Permanent Outsider Status Ahead Of Brighton Gig

Barely eighteen months into their bright burning existence, Superorganism have successfully negotiated a steep trajectory from brand new internet buzz band to real world breakout stars, with an acclaimed debut album to their name.


Sometimes you meet a new band and every member is so similar they're almost indistinguishable: all clichéd leather jackets, identical haircuts and uniform grimaces. 

That is not a charge you could level at Superorganism - they are a band of non-conformists. 

Bump into any of the eight members (Orono, Emily, Harry, Ruby, B, Robert, Tucan and Soul) in the street - a contrasting collection of disparate and idiosyncratic individuals - and you might never know they're in a band together, let alone all live in the same house.

Superorganism's difference comes from a kind of permanent outsider status. 

With members from the UK, Japan, New Zealand, Korea and Australia, they bonded via the internet rather than one geographical location, finding each other on forums while nerding out about music. 

Their similarities eventually brought them all together IRL, culminating in a mass migration to an unassuming terraced house in East London that they soon turned into an energised creative hub. 

"It's like an orphan's Christmas everyday - we're people who feel like we don't belong anywhere, so we tried to belong with each other," says Emily.

They'd been living in the East London house, putting together demos for a new, then-unnamed project, when they remembered a teenager called Orono who had been in touch after YouTube recommended she check out the music of their previous indie rock outfit.


She had come to their show in Japan and they all ended up hanging out in the Hard Rock cafe and at the zoo. 

Afterwards, they went their separate ways, but they'd keep in touch with Orono when she posted one of her lo-fi Weezer or Pavement covers to Soundcloud.

They thought she could be a cool voice to add into the mix so they sent the demo over to her.

Orono, at the time studying in Maine, New England, started recording some vocals with the microphone on her laptop. 

"I know you think I'm a sociopath, my lovely prey, I'm a cliché," she whispered. 

Within an hour she'd finished her vocals and sent it back to the band. That was their first single, Something For Your M.I.N.D. 
 
Initially, they were so freaked out by the interest they decided not to reveal their identities, but that only fuelled further interest and speculation, with journalists making wild guesses about who the band might be. 

Rather than talking to the press they went insular - they set up a shared Spotify playlist where everyone in the band could post influences and musical ideas, and a WhatsApp group where they could post lyrical fragments and memes.

From that cloud-based collaboration came the beginnings of the album, and by the time Orono had graduated high school and joined the group in London they were ready to record. What followed was an explosion of creative energy. 

With everyone in one physical space the album came quickly, with no barriers to collaboration and band members passing audio and video files from room to room in the house. 

Imagine a squat version of the Brill Building, or a lo-fi, DIY take on Max Martin's Cheiron studio, with the band creating absolutely everything: music, artwork, videos, websites.

"I guess to me, with each song we're sort of trying to make it sound like modern pop and getting it completely wrong, so it's full of mistakes and happy accidents and that draws you in." says Emily.

In just a year they've gone from a shared house side project into a global audiovisual powerhouse. Can only imagine what another twelve months will herald

New single, the aforementioned 'Something For Your M.I.N.D', will be released as a single on 12th October 2018. Superorganism play Concorde 2 Brighton on Sunday 28th October 2018. CLICK HERE for tickets.             

by: Mike Cobley




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