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Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Thursday 25 October 2018

No Cameras Allowed: How An Outlaw Rock & Roll Photographer Snapped The Likes Of Prince, U2, David Bowie, R.E.M. & Many More

No Cameras Allowed tells the story, in words and photos, of how Julian David Stone, entirely by sneaking his equipment into concerts, amassed an incredible archive of over ten thousand rock and roll photos.
Pic by Julian David Stone

Starting by simply stashing a camera in his socks, then taping equipment all over his body, to finally customising a jacket to hide equipment from security guards, he shot dozens of the greatest acts: Prince, U2, the Police, David Bowie, R.E.M., the Ramones, Elvis Costello, the Talking Heads, the Grateful Dead, Joan Jett, and many, many more. 

They were snapped from the unique vantage point of the audience, capturing exactly what the fans were seeing and the way the band meant the show to be seen. 

Culled from this never–before–seen archive, No Cameras Allowed: My Career as an Outlaw Rock and Roll Photographer contains over 250 of his best photos, along with some of the adventures he had as he evaded oversized roadies, aggressive security, and more than a few drunken fans. 


Julian said: "No cameras allowed." Imagine my surprise when a large security guard, after searching my bag, blocked me from entering the club where the Ramones were about to take stage. With a deep scowl, he flatly intoned those three heart-breaking words.

"Minutes later, back at my car, as I was about to toss my 35mm equipment on to the back seat, I froze. 

"Was it the Ramones? Was it being eighteen? Was it that streak of rebellion that we all want to believe we have? Perhaps it was all three — because I decided I was going to photograph the concert anyway.

"I strolled back to the security guard, who remembered me and looked me over from side to side. 

"Seeing no camera bag, he gave me a quick pat down, found nothing, and let me in. 

"I hurried to the bathroom, where I quickly pulled a lens from one sock and the camera body from the other. 

"I retrieved some rolls of film hidden in my crotch and quickly put everything together. Then, just as the Ramones hit the stage, I slipped out of the bathroom and began to shoot. And shoot I did.

"From that moment on, I was hooked."

'No Cameras Allowed: My Career as an Outlaw Rock and Roll Photographer' by Julian David Stone can be purchased by CLICKING HERE.

by: Mike Cobley




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Photo credit: Mario Cruzado

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Pic by Grant

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(c) The Unthanks 2018

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