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Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Monday 18 June 2018

Can You Show Me A Dream: Oral Biography Of One Time Small Face Is Big On Facts & Love

Reading the wonderful new Ronnie Lane oral biography, Can You Show Me A Dream?, it would be easy for the reader to be left with the impression that Ronnie's life cycle had been a wild journey with a sad ending. But for Ronnie the journey hadn't ended. The letter had left the envelope, that's all.

Authors Paolo Hewitt and John Hellier teamed up but were unable to find publishing partners for their printed homage to the musician. But with universal love for the Mod turned Gypsy Traveller at an all time high, fans part-funded the book before Griffiths-Publishing stepped in and a dream was born.

Can You Show Me A Dream? follows on from the authors' all encompassing Steve Marriott biography All Too Beautiful, and a very different picture is painted of the man many thought was merely Marriott's (Small Faces) sidekick and Rod Stewart's (The Faces) backroom boy. 


It was in those two bands and with those two egotistical frontman that Lane found his voice and true path

With the help of The Who's Pete Townshend he entered into a spiritual relationship with the Meher Baba (Indian spiritual master) and turned away from fame, fortune (something he never attained) and led an almost nomadic lifestyle as a farmer and travelling musician. 


His wife nurtured his inner gypsy and their farmstead was littered with an ever changing roster of musicians and friends. 

Subsequently his musical writing style changed to match that of his environment, and the pennies dried up even the though the writing well was overflowing with ideas. 


It was during this period, after years of denial, that Lane was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and his much loved life as an under the radar wandering musician minstrel started to unravel. 

He moved to the States and briefly, with the help of local musicians, continued to play live. 

He also helped to birth the charity Action for Research Into Multiple Sclerosis, and, though briefly successful, like many of his projects others benefited while those who were due lost out.

Lane passed away in the summer of 1997 and a book this thorough is long overdue.

Buy a copy of Can You Show Me A Dream?, crank up the record player, and soundtrack the man's life with his many musical adventures. A true classic .. just what the man deserved ...  

To purchase a copy of Can You Show Me Dream? CLICK HERE.

by: Mike Cobley




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