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Sunday 05 November 2017

The English Coast: Five Musicians, A Multi-Award Winning Charity & A Life Changing Campaign

It's not often a group of young men pool their creative resources to benefit the health and wellbeing of others. It's even rarer when those young men are musicians. But that's exactly what the Brighton-based collective, 40 Shillings On the Drum, have done with the release of their new single. The English Coast.
Pic by Ian Kelsey

The song grabbed the attention of Impetus, the multi-award winning Brighton and Hove charity, after the track's video scored almost thirty-thousand views via the band's Facebook page.

The lyrics and music for The English Coast track was birthed back in 2016 before 40 Shillings On The Drum had even stepped out in public. 

The video was the brainchild of 40 Shillings On the Drums' lead singer and lyricist, Dan Scully. 

"The basic premise for the video just popped into my head. People are beautiful when they smile, and I wanted to capture that moment - the moment when something makes a smile break out on a person.

"The idea naturally developed, and before long the band were seeking out volunteers from different walks of life to be a part of it. 

"The location of Castle Hill in Newhaven was perfect to film the video both because it is referenced in the song, and because it has stunning views of the English Channel.

"On 2nd July 2017, we took forty volunteers up to the filming location. The sun was shining for us and we captured some wonderful footage which I then edited together for the music video."

Dan Scully, who spent his childhood by the sea, has always been a keen admirer of England's countryside and coastline.

"I would often walk along the clifftops as a teenager, listening to my favourite albums as an escape from the tough times of secondary school. 

"Like many youngsters, I suffered from bullying throughout my time at school, but the first few months of secondary school were the toughest. 

"I didn't have any friends and used to go to the library just so that I could be alone without being picked on. 

"Although I was fortunate enough that a group of boys from my class befriended me one lunch time, I'll never forget those early months and how they made me feel alone, even at that young age." 


Scully then set about 'writing a song that captured my feelings about the beauty of England and how sometimes, a little time out from day to day life to think and look forward, can improve your disposition.'

"I wrote the bulk of the lyrics and vocal lines in an afternoon, and sent over a recording for Seb Cole, my keyboard player, who I was forming a strong, songwriting bond with.

"He put the initial music behind it, we made a few tweaks and I wrote a chorus section, and then we took it to the band to finish it off.

"2017 rolled in and as well as my songwriting bond growing ever stronger with Seb, the band as a whole were getting closer as a unit, and as friends. 

"That's around the time when our guitarist, Steve Cobley, opened up to me about his history with health problems and depression. 

"Music can be a powerful thing, and whilst I was sad to learn of the struggles he had faced in his teens, when he spoke of how the guitar had brought him out from such a dark place, I thought it was incredible. I had much admiration for the strength it must have taken to overcome his problems.

"I knew I wanted 'The English Coast' to be the closing track for our debut EP, 'Beggars Who Believe', but being an uplifting song about escape and positivity, and now knowing of Steve's own struggles over the years, I wanted it to be more than that. 

"That's when I decided that the song should have a video of its own and that we should try and capture something heartwarming."

The sentiment aligned directly with the ethos and goals of Brighton & Hove Impetus who connect with people to reduce isolation and improve wellbeing.

The charity works closely in partnership with many other voluntary sector organisations, the users of their services include people with learning disabilities, people with mental health issues, older people, people with physical disabilities and people with autistic spectrum conditions.

So charity and band are coming together for the Connect4Lonliness campaign with 40% of sales of The English Coast single going directly to Impetus.

40 Shillings On The Drum will also be hosting a night at The Prince Albert, Brighton, on Friday 17th November 2017

The evening, which will act as a fundraiser for Impetus, will see the band record a live album; to be released early next year, prior to a national tour. 

40 Shillings On The Drum's 'The English Coast' is out now. The standalone single is available through iTunes, Google Play, Amazon, and many other online retailers. 40% of all sales will go directly to Brighton & Hove Impetus. 

To donate to Brighton & Hove Impetus CLICK HERE. For more on the current activities of 40 Shillings On The Drum CLICK HERE.

by: Mike Cobley




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