Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Monday 14 August 2017

My Life In Football: Ex-Brighton Manager Micky Adams' Footballing CV Is As Long As Your Arm

Having spent almost four decades in English football – playing and managing in every professional division – Brighton & Hove Albion's ex-manager Micky Adams' experience of our national game is almost unrivalled.

As a player, Micky Adams' career took in some of the biggest clubs in the country,including Leeds United, Leicester City, and Southampton.

And he shared a dressing room with some of the biggest stars in the game – Steve Bruce, Alan Shearer and Matt Le Tissier – to name but three.

After turning to management, Adams gained four promotions with Fulham, Brighton & Hove Albion, Port Vale and into the Premier League with Leicester City.

Adams took over management of then Division Three team Brighton & Hove Albion,in April 1999. 

The club were in the middle of a financial crisis, which had seen the board sell the Goldstone Ground just to stay afloat; on the pitch the club were facing a battle for their league status.

His first full season as manager was a matter of consolidation as the club finished a respectable 11th, whilst Adams signed talent such as star striker Bobby Zamora. 

The £100,000 spent on Zamora was the only transfer outlay Adams made in building his squad.

In his second season as manager, 2000–01, Adams guided Brighton to promotion as Division Three champions after the club had spent five seasons in the league's basement division. 


A late chase for the title proved to be unnecessary, as high flying Chesterfield were deducted nine points for financial irregularities, leaving Brighton ten points clear at the season's end. 

He was named as Third Division Manager of the Season for a second time, also picking up the Third Division Manager of the Month award in September 2000.

Adams was clear about his ambitions at managing at a higher level, stating his disappointment at not being offered the management positions at either Southampton or West Ham United in the summer of 2001. 

He did leave the "Seagulls" in October 2001, though by then he had already set the foundations for Brighton to achieve a second successive promotion as Division Two champions in 2001–02. 

In a searingly honest portrait, the Yorkshireman reveals some of the stories behind those roles and also some of the best-loved figures in our game.

He details how he should have been sacked by Leeds United on Howard Wilkinson's first day at the club, how he ended up in a police cell with David Speedie, lays bare Le Tissier's genius and the booze-fuelled tour that ended with Shearer jeopardising his career and the author swapping punches with Neil Ruddock.

As a manager, the tales come just as thick and fast.

How about the time when he spent a night crawling on the floor looking for Ron Atkinson's lost tooth, or what it was really like working for enigmatic Fulham owner Mohamed Al-Fayed?

And, of course, there is the inside story of Leicester City's ill-fated trip to La Manga when the club made the headlines after becoming entangled in a sex scandal.

Adams lifts the lid on almost forty years experience in a brutal, yet entertaining, account of life at the sharp end of professional football.

Neil Moxley, with whom Adams collaborated on his autobiography, has been a reporter on national newspapers for over two decades, the majority of which was spent working on the Daily Mail. He is currently the chief sports writer of the Sunday People.

Micky Adams - My Life In Football is out on 21st September 2017 - CLICK HERE to purchase.

by: Mike Cobley




Share    


Sometimes it's good to be challenged, to be mystified by unfolding events, to be totally flummoxed by the juxtaposition of what's being revealed. But other times it's best to admit defeat and realise there is no mystery, just bitter disappointment.
Photo by Michael Fung Photography

Brighton Festival 2017's Guest Director Kate Tempest made a surprise return to the city on for a secret gig as part of the Festival's Your Place initiative, performing an exclusive rendition of her unreleased new album in full at Hangleton Community Centre. 

Snow Patrol are set to return with Wildness, their first album in seven years, which finds the band searching for clarity, connection, and meaning, while staying true to the melodic songwriting prowess that brought them to prominence. 

From an angel and a tennis player to a joyfully paint-splashed lady, Hangleton and East Brighton residents have been creating life-size 'avatars': colourfully painted, cut-out figures that explore who they are or who they would like to be for a Brighton Festival project called Looking Through Each Other's Eyes.

Rituals is the ambitious new album from Australian musician Amaya Laucirica (who played a storming set at last weekend's Brighton's Great Escape Festival). Her work blends the swirling contours of the Cocteau Twins with the wistful melodies of The Go-Betweens and the sonic depth of Yo La Tengo. 

Following last year's success, Byline Festival returns to Pippingford Park, in East Sussex, and once again promises festivalgoers a unique opportunity to recapture the spirit of festivals when they had a sense of purpose. 

John Finnemore has followed a well worn path and is pretty much your definitive BBC Radio 4 comedian; studied English at Cambridge University and cut his teeth in the Cambridge footlights rising to become its vice president in his final year. After graduating, he performed in Sensible Haircut with the Footlights team at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2000.

Following band frontman Mike Peters' major undertaking for last week's Record Store Day – which saw him perform at record shops in London, New York and Los Angeles in a three-stop transcontinental trip within twenty-four hours – The Alarm announce the release of their new album Equals.

A special ceremony is being held next month at Woodvale Cemetery, Brighton, to return the gravestone of Thomas Highflyer, a 12-year-old slave boy who was rescued from a slave dhow and died in Brighton 148 years ago.

My first visit to The Spire. As you may have guessed from the name it was once a church (St Mark's Chapel, in East Brighton). This one has been converted to an arts venue. It still looks very much like a church though, just missing the pews and altar etc and of course, it has a stage… and wonderfully, and at least on this night, a foyer with seating and a bar.

It was always a pleasure for The Brighton Magazine to host The Beat's Dave Wakeling, when he performed in the city as part of the 3 Men & Black collective (alongside Jake Burns from Stiff Little Fingers and Pauline Black and Nick Welsh from The Selecter).

A new play by Townsend Theatre Productions relives the extraordinary true story of the Grunwick Strike, a dispute that challenged the way women and immigrants are treated in the workplace.

Brighton based gallery 35 North Contemporary Fine Art is set to host Deanland, a new exhibition of original work by painter Alexander Johnson and photographer John Brockliss. 
Pic by Paul Mansfield

The Rock House Festival 2018 brings together learning disabled bands and upcoming and established music-makers from Brighton and beyond for a day of live music at Green Door Store, Brighton.

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd