Brighton Magazine

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Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Tuesday 01 August 2017

An Actor's Life For Me: Zoe Cunningham Spills The Secrets Of A Life In Front Of The Lens

Having achieved critical acclaim and been nominated for numerous awards, Zoe Cunningham knows how fulfilling it is to achieve one's dream of finding success as an actor.

However, while it's a road usually associated with blood, sweat and tears – Cunningham has most definitely cracked the code to finishing big, with ease.

In her new book, An Actor's Life For Me?, Cunningham pours out her wisdom, experience and hard-earned lessons so anyone sharing her dream can make it big without the usual and expected pitfalls.

Writing from hard-earned experience, and packed with interviews and top tips from contemporary actors, directors and agents, this book is your first successful step in achieving your acting ambitions. 

From theatre, to stage, to film and television, Zoe covers everything from initial training, methods to gain valuable experience, and on to securing an audition. 

The ultimate aim? To help you be selected for your first acting role!


"The bottom line is that most people unnecessarily take the long, complicated and expensive road to finding success as an actor," explains the author. 

"Believe me, it is a road fraught with demoralization and rejection – but it doesn't have to be this way. 

"Believe it or not, there's a blueprint you can follow. If you have the drive and are willing to put the work in, the method I share will help anyone make it big with unexpected ease.

"Every tip in the book is something I have personally tried, and something I've seen work time and time again for others. 

"It's no magic pill – you still need that burning desire to act – but it will remove much of the trial-and-error that hinders so many from achieving their dreams."

An Actor's Life For Me?" by Zoe Cunningham, is available now. CLICK HERE to purchase.

by: Mike Cobley




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Photographer unknown

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Credit Darren Bell

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