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Tuesday 23 October 2018

Ray Davies Explains Why Overlooked Kinks Masterpiece Is Getting 50th Anniversary Edition Release

"I think 'The Village Green Preservation Society' is about the ending of a time personally for me in my life," says Ray Davies. 


"In my imaginary village. It's the end of our innocence, our youth. Some people are quite old but in the Village Green, you're never allowed to grow up. I feel the project itself as part of a life cycle."

Somewhat overlooked upon its release in November 1968, The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society is now regarded as one of the best British albums ever recorded. 

Created in difficult circumstances by a band on the verge of disintegration and who refused to follow fashion, it is an album of timeless, crafted songs about growing up and growing old, and the decline of national culture and traditional ways. 

Included in the soon to be released 50th anniversary edition (released on 26th October 2018) of the album are many previously unreleased tracks and versions, including the previously unreleased track Time Song


Despite never been included on a release, Time Song was performed by The Kinks at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in January 1973, celebrating Britain's entry into the Common Market.

"When we played a concert at Drury Lane in '73 to "celebrate" us about to join what was called The Common Market, I decided to use the song as a warning that time was running out for the old British Empire." Says Ray. 

"This song was recorded a few weeks later but never made the final cut on the Preservation Act I album. 

Oddly enough, the song seems quite poignant and appropriate to release at this time in British history, and like Europe itself the track is a rough mix which still has to be finessed."


The deluxe box set includes extensive sleeve notes, interviews, photography and specially created online & press content "telling the story" of the album's production, release and cultural impact. 

Also included are two essays on the album written by Pete Townshend and renowned journalist Kate Mossman.

Launching October 4th, there will be an exhibition at London's Proud Central Gallery titled The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society which will run until 18th November 2018. 

The exhibition will display a selection of rare collector's items including specially commissioned artworks by members of the band and vintage memorabilia, together with a collection of photographs documenting this period in the band's history. 

Each work is hand-signed by surviving band members Ray Davies, Dave Davies and Mick Avory – visit www.proud.co.uk for more info.

by: Mike Cobley




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Photo credit: Mario Cruzado

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