Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Friday 06 August 2021

Lost Futures: Guitar Duo Find Harmony Among The Protests & Wildfires On Debut Collaborative Album

Guitarists Marisa Anderson and William Tyler distill deeply rooted and varied traditions into distinctive voices all their own. 
Credit Eli Johnson

Anderson and Tyler are each unyielding in their desire to extend through those traditions and the confines of "guitar music" to craft music at once intimate and expansive, conversational and transcendent. 

The duo's debut collaborative album tethers together their singular voices into unified narratives that glisten, drive, and sway. 

On Lost Futures, Anderson and Tyler's guitars dance through lush arrangements and pastoral duets serpentine and reverent.

The kindred musicians first collaborated in the days following a Portland show commemorating the life of the late David Berman.


As Anderson tells it: 

"There was an obvious and immediate affinity musically and personally which led to the feeling that we should try and do something together, but in January of 2020, both of us had pretty full schedules so it was more of a vague idea to do something, someday .. then COVID hit." 

With tours sidelined and the increasing tensions of isolation, unrest and ecological disaster looming, the duo set to composing and collaborating remotely. 

Tyler joined Anderson in Portland for a week before recording as protests across the city escalated and raging wildfires cast a dangerous haze. 

Against the tumultuous backdrop the duo found harmony in their quick, organic development as a compositional team. 

Rich ballads and breezy rambles flourished as the duo explored new rhythmic techniques and elaborated on unused riffs. 

In uniting to meditate on their musical practices together, the two guitarists composed music filled with the joy of playing together while having a sober tone reflective of the troubled state of the world around them.

Lost Futures takes its name from writer Mark Fisher's cultural theory of the loss of potential futures, the hopes and ideals which once felt inevitable but have since been interrupted. 

Anderson and Tyler's use of textural drones, rhythmic repetition and harmonic shifts embody the building tensions of uncertainty created by profound loss: loss of life, experience, companionship, compassion. 

"For every choice made, every path taken, there are multitudes of choices not made, paths not taken," notes Anderson.
 
"At the Edge of the World" manifests the energy of perpetual momentum through string player Gisela Rodriguez Fernandez's staccato jabs and the clicking scrapes of Patricia Vázquez Gómez's quijada. 

The unison melody of "Pray For Rain" sounds as a chorus collectively asking when relief will come. 

A drone-via-repetition on "Something Will Come'' invokes a sonic mirage that suspends reality as subtle yet revelatory changes froth from beneath the haze. 

Still, hope and catharsis find a way to shine through the mire in the duo's implementation of space and tonal balance. 

With title track "Lost Futures," Anderson and Tyler's lullabye-like counter melodies lace around one another with the gentle ease of a friendly embrace.

Across Lost Futures, Anderson and Tyler mold their instruments into breathtaking panoramas of blight and bliss. 

Each movement contains a dense biome of transportive sound. 

The duo's music together reckons with mounting pressures as well as the joy of newfound friendship and gratitude for being able to play together. 

In tandem, Marisa Anderson and William Tyler have composed a work of remarkable breadth, brimming with resplendent odes of solace.

by: Mike Cobley




Share    


'Gastro-Glastonbury' is on its way to Brighton for a three-day weekend with big name chefs, live theatres and headline music acts. 
Credit Aemen Sukkar

Jack Dee's live tour, Off the Telly, which was cut off in its prime when the pandemic hit the UK last spring, comes to Brighton Dome on Wednesday 6th October.

Over thirty paintings, some of which have not been seen for decades or in public before, are on display at artist Duncan Grant's Sussex home.

Marlene Dietrich was undoubtedly a superstar of Hollywood's Golden Era – but she was much more than that. 

Brighton Music Conference (BMC), the UK's foremost electronic music and networking event, kicks off this week with a much needed get-together for the music industry to collaborate and inspire each other as well as enjoying some great music and events.
Credit Alexandre Galliez

Brighton is one of the stops on a long-awaited UK tour for Canadian contemporary circus legends The 7 Fingers when they arrive at Brighton Dome to present their hit show Passagers (Passengers) on 30th September and 1st October. 
Credit Mads Perch

Placebo continue to shine a light on the aspects of our society that are all too often viewed by some with scepticism at best, and hatred at worst.

Inspired by memories of working as Donald Wolfit's dresser as a young man, Ronald Harwood's evocative, affectionate and hilarious portrait of backstage life, The Dresser, is regarded as one of the most acclaimed dramas of modern theatre.

On Sunday 17 October 2021 at 4pm in Brighton Dome Concert Hall, the Mayor of Brighton & Hove will oversee an inspirational service honouring the people of our city and the lives lost from the coronavirus pandemic. Entitled A Service of Compassion, the event will serve at the heart of a city-wide initiative – A Day of Compassion. 

Acid House originals turned pioneering electronic veterans, 808 State AKA Messrs Graham Massey and Andrew Barker accompanied by live drummer Carl Sharrocks will play a full headline set at Concorde 2, Brighton, next month.

Rob Brydon has come to this interview directly from the photo shoot for his new live tour, A Night of Songs & Laughter, which visits Brighton Dome on Saturday 25 September. 
Credit Graham Cameron

Over the course of the coronavirus pandemic, Brighton Dome employee Graham Cameron produced a series of striking illustrations detailing his experience of lockdown, the impact of Covid-19 on the arts and his time furloughed from work.
Credit Raving Beauties

Retain those carefree thoughts and long hot days of summer with the new golden sounds from long-time Brighton Magazine favourites, Raving Beauties.

The Slow Readers Club, are back with their latest and most anthemic single yet, Tell No Lies; a synth-driven alternate anthem ready-made in time for the band's long anticipated – and three times rescheduled – UK Headline tour, which visits Chalk Brighton, next month. 

Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd