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Monday 16 September 2019

Brighton-Bound She Drew The Gun Rewrite Frank Zappa's Trouble Every Day To Reflect Our Troubled Times

She Drew The Gun are about to release a reinterpretation of Frank Zappa's, Trouble Every Day.

Frontwoman Louisa Roach has updated the lyrics to reflect our troubled times:
 
"I heard 'Trouble Every Day' and thought it would make a great cover. 

"Frank Zappa wrote (the track) based on the TV coverage of the Watts riots in LA back in the 60's, so I rewrote some of the lyrics to reflect what I've seen reported on the TV in more recent times, from English riots to the Extinction Rebellion protests. 

"It takes a look at the issues that are facing us at the moment from the rise of the far right to the threat of climate change and the role the global media corporations play in supporting neoliberal ideology." 


The revisions to the lyrics received the full blessing of the Zappa estate who were keen to hear the song adapted to suit contemporary times.

Earlire this year the band released the single Something For The Pain, which was accompanied by a black & white video, produced and directed by Johnny Gregory.   


"The song is about a conversation with a refugee set in the future," says Louisa. 

"At the point where the refugee crisis has become so big and automation so ubiquitous, that what is left of the first world finally make the decision to become a people rather than profit based society, one that treats everybody as citizens giving them their basic needs. 

"In the video we played with the idea of that future exchange using 'Jenny Holzer'style text art to create a narrative and dancers to represent the conversation." 

Something For The Pain was lifted from the Wirral four-pieces second album, the James Skelly (The Coral) produced, Revolution Of Mind,.

Louisa Roach isn't a protest singer. The ambitious, melodic psych pop this Merseyside artist makes under the moniker She Drew The Gun is too abstract for that label, more dreamy than didactic. 

"I've always felt drawn to music that says something," explains Roach. 

"Music that goes beyond simple love songs. As a songwriter, you've got the whole spectrum of human experience to draw from; half of that is the bigger picture stuff."

The new single accompanies the Trouble Everyday tour which visits Concorde 2, Brighton, on Thursday 24th October 2019.  For tickets CLICK HERE.

by: Mike Cobley




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