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Sunday 08 September 2019

Rare Photographs Of David Bowie Go On Display @ Brighton Dome's Heritage Open Day

As part of Heritage Open Day on later this month, newly acquired photographs of David Bowie performing at Brighton Dome will go on display in the venue for the first time.
Photographer unknown

The images were originally taken at Bowie's Ziggy Stardust concert on 23rd May 1973 by an unknown photographer from the Evening Argus and Saler Photographic, a local picture agency which was based at 40 Preston Road.

Alex Epps, Senior Programming Co-Ordinator at Brighton Dome said:

"We'd love to know who the photographers were who took the shots but we've not been able to find out any more information."

Further items on display include a box of Brighton Dome concert tickets thought to be found in a house clearance, including performances by the popular opera singer Adelina Patti. 

The tickets dating back to 1901 are priced 15 shillings, which would cost the equivalent of £80 today. 

The items will be added to the venue's archive as part of Brighton Dome's heritage research project. 


Alex Epps added:

"We are really excited to include these new additions to the archive as they really bring Brighton Dome's history to life .. with our backstage tours and open days we hope visitors will enjoy learning about the past and sharing their own personal memories of the venue."

Heritage Open Day is the largest annual festival of history and culture in the country. 

This year, Brighton Dome will be joining the festival's 25th anniversary theme of People Power, revealing the stories of influential characters and public figures who have been connected to the venue's history from the past to the present day.

Local historian and writer Philip Morgan will recount how the Royal Pavilion Estate became the property of the people in 1850, when a group of influential Brighton locals bought the palace from Queen Victoria. 

169 years later, young women from the Miss Represented arts project will display an exhibition and documentary screening showcasing life in Brighton today through photography, music and spoken word.

Other highlights include a recital by acclaimed musician Michael Wooldridge who will play the original Brighton Dome organ dating from 1935. 

Backstage tours will take visitors into the dressing rooms where thousands of famous artists have prepared and catch a rare glimpse of the infamous underground Royal Pavilion tunnels.

Heritage Open Day at Brighton Dome on Saturday 14th September 2019, 10am-4pm. Free admission. CLICK HERE for info.    

by: Mike Cobley




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