Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Tuesday 09 July 2019

Interview: Food Writer & Journalist Nigel Slater Reveals How His Memoir Will Be Brought To Life @ Theatre Royal Brighton

Based on the British Book Awards Biography of the Year, Toast is a new play based on Nigel Slater's award winning autobiography. 

Vividly recreating suburban England in the 1960s, Nigel's childhood is told through the tastes and smells he grew up with and the audience with be enveloped by the evocative sights and sounds of cookery that defined the definitive moments of his youth.

Here the food writer and journalist tells us about seeing his memoirs brought vividly to life on stage, bringing food into the theatre and the surprising impact his story has had on audiences.

Q/ What's Toast about?

Nigel Slater (NS): Toast is the story of a little boy who feels abandoned because his mother dies when he's very young and his father falls in love with another woman. 

The boy's life suddenly changes with the arrival of a woman who's completely different from his mother. 

It's about learning to make your own way and gaining the strength to do something surprising at that young age, make big decisions about your life.


Q/ It's your story, but it sounds like you've managed to separate yourself from the character of Nigel.

Nigel Slater (NS): I have, a little bit. There's fifty years between us! He will always be another person until I sit in the theatre and watch either very tender scenes or very upsetting scenes. 

Then suddenly all those emotions come flooding back and it isn't that little boy any more, it's me. The words I spoke stayed with me. I put them in the book and now they're on stage as well. 

Q/ What moved you to write your memoirs?

Nigel Slater (NS): I wasn't the driving force, actually. I was asked to write an article about the food of my childhood. 

When I started writing, I realised that everything I was tasting brought back a lot of memories. 

Every food item was associated very clearly with a particular part of my life or vignette from my childhood. 

The day after it was published, my editor said "I think it should be a book."

Q/ How did you feel when playwright Henry Filloux-Bennett asked about adapting it for the theatre?

Nigel Slater (NS): I said "No." I just didn't see how it would work on stage. But when he sent part of the script I was completely blown away. 

I could feel the emotions; I could almost reach out and touch the people. I thought "This is going to work, let's have a go." 

Jonnie Riordon, the director, has done this thing that directors do of making the show not a slightly sad story of a little boy losing his mum and being forced to live with a stepmum he didn't like, but a really joyous performance. 

Right from the start, he decided that the heart and soul of this show is food. 

When I walked in on the very first night at the Lowry in Salford, I thought "Where's the smell of toast coming from." It was Jonnie walking round waving bits of toast before the audience sat down.

There's magic to it when the food appears. For instance, my stepmother will open a cupboard and there will be a wonderful cake or some pastries waiting. 

It's like little doors keep opening and food keeps appearing. The food is almost a cast member in its own right. 

The cast, as well as having to remember their lines, positions and all the usual things actors do, also have to run into the audience and hand out sweeties and treats. It really makes quite an impact. 

Q/ How involved with the production have you been?

Nigel Slater (NS): It is my story, so I do feel protective of it. But Henry Henry got the spirit of the book straight away and Jonnie picked up the sense of fun, so I felt it was all in extremely good hands. 

I've kept a close watch on it, but everyone understood it is more than just a story of a little boy and his mum. It's a bigger than that. It's affected many people. 

There are so many children that have felt abandoned after a bereavement. There are so many children that don't understand why this new person"s come into Dad"s life or Mum's life that they have to accept. 

It isn't just my story. Lots of kids have that emotionally tough time. I hadn't realised so many people would come up to me, send me letters or write emails saying "That is my story. That happened to me."

Q/ How important is it then that a story that so many people can relate to is touring the UK after its London run?

Nigel Slater (NS): I'm thrilled that it's in London. I'm overjoyed. But the fact that it's going to all those cities around Britain is such a buzz. 

It is a countrywide, universal story; children having a tough time but not being able to talk about it. I couldn't be happier that it's going round the country. 

Q/ How closely have you worked with Giles Cooper, who plays the younger Nigel?

Nigel Slater (NS): We have become very good friends. We talk a lot and he asks a lot of questions, which is great, but I've never, at any time, said "Nigel wouldn't do that" or "Nigel didn't say that." I don't want a carbon copy of little Nigel. And Giles is just wonderful. He plays Nigel with aplomb. 

Q/ Finally, what can audiences expect from a trip to see Toast?

Nigel Slater (NS): They can expect a magic, the luxury of nostalgia and some fantastic surprises and treats that you don't usually get at the theatre. 

It might be worth popping in a Kleenex as well, because there have been quite a few tears.

Nigel Slater's 'Toast' plays at Theatre Royal Brighton from Monday 28th October to Saturday 2nd November 2019. CLICK HERE for tickets.

by: Mike Cobley & Matthew Amer




Share    


Abigoliah Schamaun's almost figured it all out. A former yoga instructor with surprisingly squishy thighs who identifies as heteronormative disguised as a luscious lady lover, Abigoliah grew up in the conservative corn-belt of mid-West America to become an unabashedly liberal London based comic. 

Brighton-based singer-songwriter Hayley Ross is an outlier, a one-off, a self-starter and quiet disruptor who refuses to be pinned down. 

Having been described as the missing link between Joy Division and Pendulum, London-based Pumarosa are a band opening their doors of perception on to pastures new.

Brighton Gin has teamed up with Brighton based artist Hizze Fletcher to create a label to recognise the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which mark the birth of the Gay Liberation Movement (GLM). 

The Alzheimer's Society has called on MPs across the South East to support a dedicated Dementia Fund to end the 'financial punishment' faced by people living with dementia
 

Taking a break from her day job in Vermont indie folk trio Mountain Man, Molly Sarlé's new solo direction sees her making lush, widescreen folk pop with a warm West Coast feel; a direction recently revealed in new track, This Close:

In Emily Brontë's classic novel, romance and passion are accompanied by revenge, ghosts and death — it is definitely not just a love story between Cathy and Heathcliff.
Credit Tom Woollard

Two of the UK's most innovative theatre companies, Gecko and Mind the Gap, have announced a co-production called A Little Space, which will visit The Old Market in Brighton, this December.

One Eyed Jacks was Spear of Destiny's second release on the major label Epic Records. For many original fans this is the band's seminal album.

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd