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Wednesday 11 October 2017

Interview: Ex Del Amitri Frontman Justin Currie Hits The Road In Support Of Fourth Solo Release

Years before Justin Currie was writing top ten albums with Del Amitri, he was enjoying a musical awakening courtesy of some of the biggest bands in history. And in his typical self-depreciating style, Currie admits there were one or two less fashionable favourites along the way too.

"I got into The Beatles when I was very young, and I was relatively young when I got into Dylan," the 52-year-old reminisces

"I went through my heaviest phase when I was at secondary school and I got into prog rock, and really awful bands like Rush and Genesis and Yes.

"But the brilliant thing about punk rock was that it was a clean sweep – you literally threw those records in the bin and embraced this revolutionary style. 

"Punk rock was the main reason that me or any of my contemporaries got involved in music,because in 76 music was moribund, it was full of blokes in flares singing about goblins. 

"And then punk rock said you don't even need to play very well. If you've got an idea you're part of this."

The Scotsman went onto form Del Amitri – best known for tracks such as Nothing
Ever Happens and Always The Last To Know – and prove himself as a gifted singer-songwriter.

His latest solo album, This Is My Kingdom Now , proves no exception. But Currie is adamant there"s no great secret to successful songwriting. 


"I don't have a particular well that I go too to supply lyrics," he muses. 

"It comes off the top of your head. If things are coming off the top of your head though, a lot of the time it's been struggling around your subconscious for a while.

"Sometimes I'll write a half a song or all a song just on the page, and then structure chords and the melody around it. 

"Usually, and I think this is true of most songwriters, what makes you a songwriter and not something else is that when a line comes to you, it comes with a melody integral to it. 

"You can't get away from that melody, so each phrase you come up with, or each bunch of lines, you come up with fits that.

"But you sit at a piano and things that have been floating around your subconscious
suddenly flood out."

Kicking off on the 13th October in Manchester, Currie and his band The Pallbearers
will be heading throughout the UK in support of This Is My Kingdom Now . 

And he's got his eye on a couple of dates that represent new horizons for the former Del Amitri frontman.

"Anywhere I've not played before I find really interesting," he explains. 

"So I'll be intrigued by Chester, and I've only done Exeter once before which is quite an interesting place. 

To me it's about what the venue's like and whether I can wander around town for a couple of hours and see if I can find anything interesting."

Indeed the ability to relax in between sets, Currie says, is one of the biggest perks of
not being part of a high-profile project like Del Amitri. 

Fans may even get the chance to see the Scot enjoying the sights and sounds of their city before getting a glimpse of him on stage.

"We never used to get that time when we were being successful because there was always so much to do," he chuckles. 

"So the great thing about being a failure is that you get a lot of your own time! You can wander around the streets and got to second-hand bookshops and the like, and you do start to get a flavour of the places you're visiting. I love to just wander about when I've got the time."

Justin Currie and The Pallbearers will kick off their tour on 13th October and play Brighton The Old Market on Monday 30th October 2017 – for more information on dates and tickets head to www.justincurrie.com

by: Jake Taylor




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