Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Wednesday 08 February 2017

Going On A Bear Hunt: TV World Traveller Ian Wright Takes A Tough Boat To The Artic

With his hearty cackle and ever-ready ability to crack a joke, TV world traveller Ian Wrightis truly living the dream. But he"ll need his wits about him on his next adventure, as he ventures deep into the Arctic in search of colder climates, cod and carnivorous critters.

In a lot of ways, Ian Wright isn't your typical TV traveller; he didn't get his first televised gig until he was 28, and he sure isn't going to be found out for feigning his expeditions while secretly living in the lap of luxury off-camera. 

Wright's unique brand of infectiously enthusiastic exploration has made him a firm favourite since his time on Globe Trekker , and his newest adventure on Travel Channel's aptly-titled Tough Boats saw the Suffolk-born Wright land himself aboard a working trawler in the middle of the coldest part of the Pacific.

Thankfully for Wright, the choppy seas didn't pose as much of a problem to him as they might to the average landlubber – and he was determined to put forward a good showing for our little island's proud maritime history.

"If you're on a fishing trawler in the Bering Sea, the freezing Arctic, for two weeks then seasickness wouldn't bode well - that's the worst thought," he laughs. 

"Because I've done a few little boat trips I thought I'd just see how it went, I thought I was being stupid but in the end I had quite good sea legs. 

"The director felt bad for a little while because it was very up and down, but the mad thing is you look at that water going up and down like that and all the trawler-men were like 'Oh this is nothing darling, don't worry about this! This is calm!""

Those hardened seafarers didn't just teach Wright and the crew about what does or does not constitute a maelstrom, but they also opened his eyes to the finer points of what we in Britain might consider common ocean cuisine.

"Cod for me is the most boring fish on the plate," the 51-year-old declares. "I love fish and chips but it's more about the batter and the chips and all that. But cod is just this white, rubbery nonsense - it's flavourless. 

"And I asked the trawler-men what the best fish was, and I thought they'd say halibut because we caught a massive 50-pounder and they were cutting that up and hoofing that down.

"But they said no, it's always cod, and they went down into the kitchen - this cod had been caught two hours before in the cold Bering Sea, and then it's on your plate.

Swear to God, I thought I'd tasted cod, but I definitely had not. What we have is rubbish. Sometimes it's frozen twice, the stuff we get. That was the best fish I've ever tasted - nothing like I've ever had before, absolutely mad, so good! It was sensational!"

Having made his way to Longyearbyen in Svalbard, Wright left the company of cod fisherman to seek a larger, land-roaming prize. 

Hopping aboard an icebreaker, the presenter went off into the Arctic wilderness in search of the rare and fearsome polar bear.

"Although it's beautiful and majestic and everything that you can imagine, it also looks like the most powerful thing on earth," he effuses. 

"If that gave you one of those death stares you'd be thinking it's all over for me! So although it's stunning, you got that shudder of power because it might look beautiful and chilled out but you know underneath that it's a killer."

But the bears weren't the only animal to pop in on Wright's Arctic escapade.

"We were also out on the boat and seeing walruses, and that was just as exciting and mind-blowing," he says

"They came up right by the boat, so we were almost within touching distance. And they look like old men with those big handlebar moustaches - all like 'What's going on here?'"

For all his joking, however, Wright is quite to remind us that these kind of sites can't be taken for granted – especially in a place where the sea-ice is melting at an unprecedented rate year on year, leaving less and less habitat for the creatures who call the Arctic their home.

"It's like that thing when you see a whale or something, you get that sad, hippy thing of the 'Oh the whale's so large, I'm so small and insignificant'," Wright concludes.

"But you can't help it. These things are so rare, and you rarely see things that are twice the size of you out in the wild, that you should feel like that."

Tough Boats continues in The Arctic on Wednesday 15th February on Travel Channel, 9pm.

by: Jake Taylor - via Interview Hub




Share    


A play about the life of Manchester Arena bomb victim Martyn Hett is set to come to the Brighton Fringe almost one year since the tragic event.
Pic by Andy Sturmey

Riding the wave of success and universal critical acclaim for their most recent album, F.E.A.R, Marillion graced the stage at Brighton Dome last night (16/4/18) and served up an epic and confident display of prog.

Superorganism is a London-based, eight person collective of international musicians and pop culture junkies from Japan, Korea, Australia, New Zealand and the UK, who have, in just eighteen months, amassed a global fan base and acclaimed début album. 

Spymonkey's Stephan Kreiss will join Scottish actor Pauline Knowles in the world première of Problem in Brighton, a brand new alt-rock/pop pantomime written and directed by Brighton Festival 2018 Guest Director David Shrigley.

He's still the undisputed champion of Superbike; the most successful rider ever in the sport's history. Now Carl Fogarty is fifteen years into a retirement that has seen him be crowned King of the Jungle and trek across Patagonia, but, as for any former champion, giving up the sport that made him a household name has been no easy task.
(c) Delaram Pourabi

TT, also known as Theresa Wayman, vocalist and guitarist of Warpaint, has unveiled lead single I've Been Fine, in the run up to début album, LoveLaws

Brighton's Sallis Benney Theatre is set to showcase Liberated: The New Sexual Revolution, the thought provoking film that aims to encourage local students and residents to consider their current attitudes and behaviour towards sex, consent and gender.

The first glimpse of Brighton Festival 2018 is to be unveiled at Fabrica this weekend, in the form of David Shrigley's interactive installation, Life Model II.

Isaac Gracie's eponymous début album is the sound of an artist bit-by-bit breaking through the hype and the seeds of doubt that stem from the heavy expectation that greeted breakthrough song Last Words.
Photo by Bryan Kremkau

It was always a pleasure for The Brighton Magazine to host The Beat's Dave Wakeling, when he performed in the city as part of the 3 Men & Black collective (alongside Jake Burns from Stiff Little Fingers and Pauline Black and Nick Welsh from The Selecter).

Singer/songwriter Sarah McQuaid, who recently played The Greys, in Brighton, has teamed up with award-winning filmmaker Brett Harvey for a music video/short film based on the poignant true story of Bill Conner, a father who lost his daughter and cycled 1,400 miles to hear her heart beating again in the body of its recipient. 

At the height of the Industrial Revolution, Falkirk's iron and steel industry bore the town three primary exports: carronades, pillar boxes, and buses. 

When people who have 'made it' are asked what they can thank for their transformation, few people would cite cancer, near poverty or isolation.

After setting up her label Seahorse Music to publish records by like-minded women and help make them more visible in a male-dominated industry, Bryde finished up her debut LP, Like An Island, flitting, between London and LA. 

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd