Brighton Magazine

The Brighton Magazine

Selected Brighton Magazine Article

Wednesday 21 February 2018

Review: Erasure @ Brighton Dome Concert Hall

With over three decades together and having played the city numerous times, Vince Clarke and Andy Bell of Erasure are no strangers to Brighton
Pic By Andy Strumey

On Monday night their fans were out in force for another Sold Out show, and ready for the legendary electro pop duo to take to the Brighton Dome stage.

But first up were support act Bright Light Bright Light - who mix a blend of camp stage presence with electronic pop, and who feature a lead singer wearing the most colourful rainbow suit seen since Jake Shears of the Scissor Sisters.

Erasure soon take to the stage with the crowd cheering backing singers, Valerie and Emma, who are first to take their positions; silhouetted in giant light boxes, dancing to the Ron Grainer penned Tales of the Unexpected theme tune.

Andy and Vince follow and, as the familiar disco tinged intro to early- in-the-career single Oh L'amour strikes up, the crowd cheer loudly and everyone's ready for a Monday night party. 

Up next is the duo's late eighties hit Ship of Fools, with the setlist taking an emotional journey of well known pop bangers such as Chains Of Love, Victim Of Love , Drama! and Blue Savannah, through to their lesser known more reflective output; including a sprinkling of rarer album tracks and fan favourite, Phantom Bride


Their recent singles Love You To The Sky and Just A Little Love get an appreciative reaction, as does the newer material from their critically acclaimed current album World Be Gone, which covers more world weary themes.

Vince being the quieter of the duo sits high atop a 10/15 foot podium on a stage set described as Tron meets the Hamburg Red Light District.

It's visually impressive and perhaps more than a nod to Depeche Mode, Vince's first band's stage set from their well documented 1993/1994 Devotional tour, where, the then, three keyboard players were distanced from vocalist Dave Gahan.


Those sitting high up in the Dome balcony were perhaps the only ones to gain a good glimpse of Vince doing what he does best, playing on his synth set up. 

Occasionally he would add extra percussion to tracks with his electronic illuminated tambourine. He also stepped away from the synths to strum along on his guitars.

Frontman Andy Bell recently had a chest infection and subsequently cancelled the first three dates of the tour in Dublin, but was back on top form in Brighton, hitting all the high notes and sustaining the deeper vocals.  


Dressed for most of the show in a bizarre splattered jacket and t-shirt combo, the clothes were gradually peeled off to reveal an Aztec painted nearly nude full body stocking. The crowd cheering while the reveal took place. 

Often self deprecating and never one to take things seriously, the amusing between song banter included stories about his mum asking him to visit the shops as a kid to buy her denier stockings and a packet of fags, through to Britney Spears playing Brighton Pride this summer.

It was of course predictable that the highlights for the crowd were to be their old classics from the 1980s including Who Needs Love Like That, Sometimes, a brilliant cover of Blondie's Atomic, and the huge finale A Little Respect .. and a chance for the crowd to glimpse Vince when he came down from his podium to play guitar next to Andy and the backing singers.

The crowd left the Dome singing A Little Respect into the cold Brighton night. It was a night none of them will forget ….

by: Andy Sturmey




Share    


A play about the life of Manchester Arena bomb victim Martyn Hett is set to come to the Brighton Fringe almost one year since the tragic event.
Pic by Andy Sturmey

Riding the wave of success and universal critical acclaim for their most recent album, F.E.A.R, Marillion graced the stage at Brighton Dome last night (16/4/18) and served up an epic and confident display of prog.

Superorganism is a London-based, eight person collective of international musicians and pop culture junkies from Japan, Korea, Australia, New Zealand and the UK, who have, in just eighteen months, amassed a global fan base and acclaimed début album. 

Spymonkey's Stephan Kreiss will join Scottish actor Pauline Knowles in the world première of Problem in Brighton, a brand new alt-rock/pop pantomime written and directed by Brighton Festival 2018 Guest Director David Shrigley.

He's still the undisputed champion of Superbike; the most successful rider ever in the sport's history. Now Carl Fogarty is fifteen years into a retirement that has seen him be crowned King of the Jungle and trek across Patagonia, but, as for any former champion, giving up the sport that made him a household name has been no easy task.
(c) Delaram Pourabi

TT, also known as Theresa Wayman, vocalist and guitarist of Warpaint, has unveiled lead single I've Been Fine, in the run up to début album, LoveLaws

Brighton's Sallis Benney Theatre is set to showcase Liberated: The New Sexual Revolution, the thought provoking film that aims to encourage local students and residents to consider their current attitudes and behaviour towards sex, consent and gender.

The first glimpse of Brighton Festival 2018 is to be unveiled at Fabrica this weekend, in the form of David Shrigley's interactive installation, Life Model II.

Isaac Gracie's eponymous début album is the sound of an artist bit-by-bit breaking through the hype and the seeds of doubt that stem from the heavy expectation that greeted breakthrough song Last Words.
Photo by Bryan Kremkau

It was always a pleasure for The Brighton Magazine to host The Beat's Dave Wakeling, when he performed in the city as part of the 3 Men & Black collective (alongside Jake Burns from Stiff Little Fingers and Pauline Black and Nick Welsh from The Selecter).

Singer/songwriter Sarah McQuaid, who recently played The Greys, in Brighton, has teamed up with award-winning filmmaker Brett Harvey for a music video/short film based on the poignant true story of Bill Conner, a father who lost his daughter and cycled 1,400 miles to hear her heart beating again in the body of its recipient. 

At the height of the Industrial Revolution, Falkirk's iron and steel industry bore the town three primary exports: carronades, pillar boxes, and buses. 

When people who have 'made it' are asked what they can thank for their transformation, few people would cite cancer, near poverty or isolation.

After setting up her label Seahorse Music to publish records by like-minded women and help make them more visible in a male-dominated industry, Bryde finished up her debut LP, Like An Island, flitting, between London and LA. 

Archive search

Search our archives for what's on and gone for the best of this city's theatre music comedy news and much more...







Organising a conference or event in Brighton?
See our Brighton Conference section.
Brighton web design by ...ntd